Help our Red-tails

Fence off existing stands of Stringybark and Buloke and scattered paddock trees on your property, to protect from stock damage and to allow for natural regeneration.

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Incentives for nests

Incentive payments are again being offered to landholders and members of the public for the discovery of new nests sites as part of the Red-tail Nest Incentive Scheme.

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Join the count

Although we can’t guarantee you’ll see a Red-tail on the day, we’re sure you’ll enjoy a fun day out in the bush searching for our colourful cockatoos.

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Welcome

Zoos SA supporting Red-tails


Since January 2011 the Recovery Team and BirdLife Australia have been working in partnership with Zoos SA (Royal Zoological Society of South Australia) to manage and improve habitat conditions and build community capacity and support for the conservation and recovery of the South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo (SERTBC).

 

Over the last four and half years, Zoos SA have contributed just over $66,000 in funding towards the Recovery Project. This has enabled the ongoing delivery of core activities including:

•    the location, protection and maintenance of nest sites;
•    population and habitat monitoring – including the annual range-wide count, flock counts and long-term phenology study;
•    maintenance of the SERTBC website and 1800 number for sighting reports;
•    development and sharing of information with the community, including the delivery of educational presentations to community and school groups, attendance at regional field day events, and preparation and distribution of resource materials and articles about conservation activities undertaken as part of the project; and
•    supporting volunteer involvement in recovery activities for the cockatoo.

Zoos SA is a highly valued supporter of the Recovery Program and has continued to be a leader in the delivery of high priority on-ground restoration works for the cockatoo in South Australia. For example, the Zoo’s highly successful ‘Cockies helping Cockies’ project has seen more than 500 hectares of Desert stringybark habitat protected/restored and over 80 landholders engaged in this process. Their past work demonstrates the Zoo’s capacity to engage and work well with landholders and rural communities and provide value for money to deliver outstanding on-ground results for the cockatoo.

The Zoos SA component of the Recovery Project will come to a close at the end of June 2015; however the organisation has been successful in securing more funds to continue delivery of the highly successful ‘Cockies helping Cockies’ project until June 2017.
 
On behalf of the SERTBC Recovery Team and BirdLife Australia I would like to express my sincere thanks to Zoos SA for their fantastic contribution and valuable participation in the project over the last four and half years.

For more information on Zoos SA and how to get involved please click here.

Redtail News

  • Bob McPherson

    Rewards offered for Nests

    The South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo Recovery Team and BirdLife Australia are calling on landholders and members of the public to report all sightings and nest activity of the endangered South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo. More
  • Photo: David Adam

    Why can’t we keep our endangered Red-tails?

    Current regulations require a specialist permit to keep Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos. This is because of the five sub-species of Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo that occur across Australia, two of these, including our very own South-eastern sub-species, are nationally threatened.

    More
  • Geoffrey Dabb

    You've got to be nuts!

    As regular Red-tail news readers will know, seeds from the nuts or seed capsules of two stringybark eucalypts, Brown Stringybark (Eucalyptus baxteri) and Desert Stringybark (Eucalyptus arenacea) are the main year-round food of our Red-tails. More