Results

Annual Count 2019

This year 81 groups totalling 172 volunteers took part in the annual count for the endangered South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo across the range on Saturday 4 May.

The weather conditions improved this year with less wind and rain than the previous few years, which meant that the calls of the cockies were able to be heard more easily. After several years of lower count results it is pleasing to report that the number of birds counted increased considerably this year.

After taking into consideration double counts the final tally stands at 1193 birds, which is substantially higher than last year’s total of 839 birds. Additional sightings either side of the count were also incorporated into the total including a flock of 200 birds, the largest sighting recorded in the count.

The number of sightings reported by volunteers this year was 43, which is slightly less than last year's total of 45.

Figure 1: A flock of South-eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoos observed on count day landing in trees. Photo: Kristen Capewell

The distribution of sightings was fairly widespread, with birds again recorded as far north as McCallum (40km NE of Keith). 

There was good weather on the day across most of the range meaning it would have been easier to both see and hear the Red-tails, which may have contributed to the higher number of birds counted this year.

The information gathered during the annual count is crucial to determine patterns of habitat use, the minimum number of birds in the population and most importantly, the location of large flocks. Flock sizes this year were larger than they have been in previous years, with seven large flocks (greater than 80 birds) recorded.

This year, large flocks were found near Edenhope, Penola, Rennick, Dry Creek, Wandilo and Kanawinka. Other sightings were made near Goroke, Harrow, Coonawarra, Dergholm, Nangwarry, Casterton, Nelson, Lucindale, Millicent, Tooan and Frances.

The table below provides a breakdown of the results for South Australia and Victoria. This year the number of Red-tails and sightings observed in Victoria (799 birds and 18 sightings/flocks excluding double counts) was greater than that seen in South Australia (394 birds and 10 sightings/flocks excluding double counts).

Twenty-five groups observed Red-tails either on count day or within a few days of the count.

Table 1: Observations and Results of 2019 annual count by state and region 

State/

Region

Total No. of RTBC sightings/flocks

4-5-19

No. of sightings/flocks excluding double counts

 

No. birds counted

 

 

No. of sites/areas

searched

No. of volunteers searching

No. kilometres of habitat searched

South Australia

 

15

 

10

394

43

57

486

Glenelg Hopkins

 

18

 

11

494

42

72*

1682

Wimmera

 

10

 

7

305

32

48*

975

Victoria (Wimmera & Glenelg Hopkins)

28

 

18

799

74

115

2657

Total (SA & Vic)

43

 

28

1193

117

172

3143

*some volunteers surveyed sites in both regions (Glenelg Hopkins and Wimmera) and thus have been included (for reporting purposes) in total numbers participating in each region.

Figure 2: Observations and counts of South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos recorded as part of the 2019 annual count (double counts excluded)

The annual Baileys Rocks campout was again a success, with volunteers gathering on the night to share stories on how many cockies they saw or the flock that got away.

A total of 10 volunteers also attended the Annual Count training session on the morning of the count. This session took place in Rotary Park at Casterton and volunteers learned what the Red-tails sounds like, the tell-tale feeding signs of the birds, and how to identify stringybark from other eucalypt woodland.

Volunteer effort was fantastic, with 81 groups spending over 270 hours searching for the cockatoos across the range. This year we had volunteers from a variety of different backgrounds including farmers who searched their own properties, a great team of locals who regularly take part in the count, and several participants who travelled from as far as Adelaide and Melbourne to help out with the survey.

Figure 3: Tim Burnard teaching volunteers about the South-eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoos at the Casterton training session. Photo: Kelsey Bennett

Acknowledgements

On behalf of the Red-tail Recovery Team and BirdLife Australia I would like to express my sincere thanks to all the volunteers, including all those who reported sightings of Red-tails in the lead up the count, for supporting this annual event. Without volunteer support this event would not be possible.

A special thanks to Evan Roberts, Kerry Gilkes and Jeremy Freeman for their assistance with promoting the count and getting local landholders involved on the day, and Tim Burnard for running the training session in Casterton and organising the campsite at Baileys Rocks.

The SERTBC Recovery Program is managed by BirdLife Australia and is supported by the South East Natural Resources Management Board, Wimmera Catchment Management Authority and Glenelg Hopkins Catchment Management Authority through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program.

   
   

Annual Count 2018

This year 89 groups totalling 179 volunteers took part in the annual count for the endangered South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo across the range on Saturday 5 May.

Despite the huge search effort, which saw over 3600kms of stringybark forest tracks covered, our cockies proved once again elusive with less than a third of our counters locating Red-tails on the day.

After taking into consideration double counts and two additional sightings of Red-tails recorded on days either side of the count the final tally stands at 839 birds - which is slightly more than the 810 birds recorded last year.

A total of 43 sightings were made on the day, however many of these were double counts of the same birds.


Figure 2: A flock of South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos observed on count day landing in trees near a drinking trough at Dry Creek. Photo: Kristen Capewell.

 

The distribution of sightings was again widespread with one flock seen as far north as McCallum (40km NE of Keith). Flock sizes were also smaller than usual with only four large flocks (greater than 80 birds) recorded. 

Red-tails are notoriously difficult to find. What makes it more challenging is when flock sizes are small, widespread and located in areas that our counters can’t access, such as private land.

Larger flocks are often noisier and so more likely to be detected than smaller flocks, while birds on private land can be easily missed if not for the support of the landholder.

Weather conditions also play a big part in the number of birds counted on the day. This year we experienced less than ideal conditions (wet and windy) in both the lead up to the count and on the day -  across most parts of the range. Windy conditions make hearing birds difficultand let’s face it - you’re more likely to hear a Red-tail before you see one.

Although total numbers are down, it’s unlikely the population has suffered a mass decline since our biggest count of over 1500 birds back in 2015. It’s more likely that birds were scattered widely across their range and simply missed on the day.

The overall prognosis for the population, however, is far from good. Flock counts, which are undertaken after the annual count and provide our best indication of breeding success, have revealed a disturbing trend with declining numbers of females and juveniles recorded in flocks over time.

Fewer adult females means fewer breeding pairs and thus fewer offspring; fewer juveniles means less birds available to replace present breeding pairs in future.

Unfortunately, the last good breeding event was more than 10 years ago. Breeding success is strongly linked to stringybark food availability, with more successful breeding in years of plentiful food.

Counts of large flocks are currently underway based on the information gained through the annual count. Once completed, this will indicate how well the birds bred last season.

This year, large flocks were found near Rennick, Chetwynd, Wattle Range (west of Penola) and Mumbannar. The biggest of these comprised 135 birds drinking from a trough on private land adjacent Rennick State Forest.

Other sightings were made near Harrow, Goroke, Charam, Wandilo, Dry Creek, Dergholm, Lake Mundi, Heywood, Willalooka, Clear Lake, Lucindale, McCallum and Casterton.

Interestingly, many flocks seen this year were found on private land which is why the widespread efforts of landholders to put feeding habitat back on their properties is so important.

The following table provides a breakdown of the results for South Australia and Victoria. This year the number of Red-tails and sightings observed in Victoria (629 birds and 16 sightings/flocks excluding double counts) was greater than that seen in South Australia (210 birds and 13 sightings/flocks excluding double counts).

Twenty-six groups observed Red-tails on count day; with an additional two groups providing sightings of birds (included in the final tally) either side of count day.

Table 1: Observations and Results of 2018 annual count by state and region

State/

Region

Total No. of RTBC sightings/flocks

5-5-18

 

No. of additional sightings/

flocks

 

No. of sightings/flocks

 

No. birds counted

 

 

No. of sites/areas

searched

No. of volunteers searching

No. kilometres of habitat searched

South Australia

 

15

2

13

210

67

64

831.3

Glenelg Hopkins

 

17

0

9

433

42

79*

1734.1

Wimmera

 

11

0

7

196

50

44*

1102.2

Victoria (Wimmera & Glenelg Hopkins)

28

0

16

629

92

115

2836.3

Total (SA & Vic)

43

2

29

839

159

179

3667.6

*some volunteers surveyed sites in both regions (Glenelg Hopkins and Wimmera) and thus have been included (for reporting purposes) in total numbers participating in each region.

 

Figure 3: Observations and counts of South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos recorded as part of 2018 annual count. Double counts excluded

The annual Baileys’ Rocks campout was again well attended with around 30 volunteers braving cold conditions to share results and tales from another long days counting. This year’s biggest counters were Adrienne and Trudy who counted the large flock at Rennick.

This year we had a great mix of new and returning participants comprising local volunteers, farmers who chose to survey their own stringybark patches, and interstate participants many of whom travelled long distances to take part. Without their incredible effort, this event would not be possible.

Volunteer effort was again outstanding, with volunteers spending approximately 360 hours scouring more than 3,600 km of stringybark forest in search of Red-tails.

 

Figure 4: Volunteers attending the Baileys Rocks BBQ and Campout. Photo: Tim Burnard.

 

Acknowledgements:

On behalf of the Red-tail Recovery Team and BirdLife Australia I would like to express my sincere thanks to all the volunteers, including all those who reported sightings of Red-tails in the lead up the count, for supporting this annual event. Without volunteer support this event would not be possible.

A special thanks to Evan Roberts, Felicity Lord and Kerry Gilkes for their assistance with promoting the count and getting local landholders involved on the day and Tim Burnard for running the training session in Casterton and organising the campsite at Baileys Rocks.

The SERTBC Recovery Program is managed by BirdLife Australia and is supported by Natural Resources South East, Glenelg Hopkins Catchment Management Authority and Wimmera Catchment Management Authority through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

 

Annual Count 2017

 Male SERTBC photographed on count day - Image Luke Leddy

 

This year 84 groups totalling 172 volunteers took part in the annual count for the endangered South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo across the range on Saturday 6 May.

Although 154 sites were searched, the birds proved elusive.  The result? 810 Red-tails counted across south-western Victoria and the South East of South Australia.

With flocks widely dispersed and considerably smaller than last year, the windy conditions made finding the birds even more difficult.

The occurrence of smaller flocks this year may also be partly to blame for the fewer Red-tails counted.

Red-tails are often very difficult to find at the best of times, especially given their rarity and widespread distribution, from Natimuk and Keith south to Nelson and Mount Gambier.

Although the number of cockies counted this year is lower than last year, it is unlikely that the population has suffered a significant decline over the last 12 months.  It is more likely the birds were simply missed on the day.

This year Red-tails were seen near Casterton, Goroke, Edenhope, Harrow, Dergholm, Nelson, Lucindale, Frances, Coonawarra, Nangwarry, Heywood, Wattle Range, Naracoorte and Tarpeena. Only one flock of more than 100 birds was recorded, east of Edenhope.

Female SERTBC perched in stringybark on count day - Image Kristen Capewell

Information gathered during the annual count is used to determine patterns of habitat use, a minimum number of birds and, most importantly, the locations of large flocks.

Flock counts are carried out in the weeks following the annual count as they provide the best indication of breeding success.

These subsequent counts are proving difficult as the Recovery Team relies on finding the large flocks to count as they come in to drink in the evening, but with water still lying across the landscape, finding the birds’ drinking spots is proving quite a challenge.

The following table provides a breakdown of the results for South Australia and Victoria. This year the number of birds and RTBC sightings observed in Victoria (660 birds and 17  sightings/flocks excluding double counts) was greater than that seen in South Australia (150 birds and 9 sightings/flocks excluding double counts).

Eighteen survey groups observed RTBCs on count day; with an additional four groups providing sightings of birds (included in the final tally) either side of count day.

Table 1: Observations and results of 2017 Annual Count by State.

State

Total No. of RTBC sightings/flocks

6-5-17

 

No. of additional sightings/

flocks

 

(included but not recorded on count day)

No. of sightings/flocks

 

(after excluding; double counts)

No. birds counted

 

(after excluding double counts)

No. of sites/areas

searched

No. of volunteers searching

No. kilometres of habitat searched

South Australia

 

10

2

9

150

60

59

882

Victoria (Wimmera & Far South West)

28

2

17

660

94

113

2635

Total

38

4

26

810

154

172

3517

 

There was yet another wonderful turnout of volunteers to help on the day comprising locals, farmers who chose to survey their own stringybark patches, and interstate participants who travelled from as far away as Adelaide and Melbourne.

Volunteer effort was again outstanding, with volunteers spending over 340 hours scouring more than 3,500 km of stringybark forest in search of Red-tails.

The annual Baileys Rocks Campout was again a big success, with more than 30 cocky counters gathering to catch up on who saw how many cockies where.

Counters attending Baileys Rocks Campout - Image Tim Burnard

RTBC Annual Count App

The CyberTracker RTBC Annual Count App was again trialled by 9 people to improve data handling and accuracy.  It again received mixed reviews, but was found to be very useful for detailing the exact route taken on the day. The Recovery Team will be looking to take on board people’s feedback and suggested improvements in readiness for next year’s count.

Acknowledgements

On behalf of the Red-tail Recovery Team and BirdLife Australia I would like to express my sincere thanks to all the volunteers, including all those who reported sightings of Red-tails in the lead up the count, for supporting this annual event. Without volunteer support this event would not be possible.

A special thanks to Evan Roberts for his assistance with promoting the count and getting local landholders involved on the day, Bronwyn Perryman for her support and knowledge and Tim Burnard for running the training session in Casterton and organising the campsite at Baileys Rocks.

The SERTBC Recovery Program is managed by BirdLife Australia and is supported by Natural Resources South East, Glenelg Hopkins Catchment Management Authority and Wimmera Catchment Management Authority through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

**Please note - A map of results will be prepared and uploaded soon.**

Article prepared by Kerry Gilkes


Annual Count 2016

A flock of Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos near Casterton. Photo Credit Mike Sverns

More than 150 volunteers helped celebrate 20 years of counting cockies as part of this year’s annual count for the endangered South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo, which was held last month on Saturday 7 May.

Despite a record number of 52 sightings recorded on the day, the total number of cockatoos counted was considerably lower than last year’s total.

After taking into consideration double counts of cockatoos and three additional sightings of Red-tails recorded either side of count day the final tally stands at 901 birds, well down on last year’s record of 1545 birds.

Flocks were widely dispersed and considerably smaller this year, with only six large flocks of more than 80 birds recorded. Of these large flocks, three were determined to be double counts, and could not be included in the final tally.

The distribution and high occurrence of smaller flocks over a wide area may be partly to blame for the fewer Red-tails counted this year.

Red-tails are often very difficult to find, especially given their rarity and widespread distribution — spanning over 18,000km2 from Natimuk to Nelson in south-western Victoria and Mount Gambier to Keith in the South East of South Australia.

Although total numbers are down, it is unlikely that the population has suffered a rapid decline over the last 12 months; it’s more likely that birds were simply missed on the day.

This year counters found Red-tails near Casterton, Frances, Millicent, Naracoorte, Wilkin, Mt-Arapiles, Little Desert National Park, Miga Lake, Hotspur, Harrow and Cobboboonee.

The greatest concentrations of Red-tails (just over 60 per cent of all birds recorded) were found west of Casterton. It’s no surprise, then, that the biggest flocks recorded on the day — 334 birds drinking at a trough on the western boundary of Drajurk State Forest and 180 feeding near Cawker Creek — were found in this area.

The annual flock counts, which follow in the weeks after the count, have now revealed more than 700 birds currently feeding and residing in the Casterton area. Richard Hill and Tim Burnard were fortunate enough to count a staggering 501 birds come into drink at puddles in wheel ruts in Nangeela State Forest earlier this week.

Good numbers of Red-tails were also observed near Frances on the day, with follow-up surveys, thanks to Evan Roberts, revealing a total count of 136 birds for this area.

As always, information gained from the annual count is used to determine patterns of habitat use, a minimum number of birds and — most importantly — the location of large flocks. This information is essential for staff to carry out flock counts (counts of males vs barred birds - females and juveniles), which provide the best indication of breeding success.
 
Findings from this year’s flock counts will be available later in the month.

The annual count also helps to raise awareness of the needs of the cockatoo and offers volunteers a chance to become involved in recovery activities.

There was yet another wonderful turnout of volunteers to help on the day comprising locals, farmers who chose to survey their own stringybark patches, and interstate participants who travelled from as far away as Adelaide and Melbourne.

Volunteer effort was again outstanding, with 77 groups spending over 360 hours scouring more than 4,000 km of stringybark forest for the cockatoos across the range.

The annual Baileys Rocks Campout was again a big success with 24 people braving the wintery conditions to top off a big day of counting. Those attending were rewarded with a delicious cake thanks to Kerry Gilkes to celebrate 20 years of counting cockies.

Above: Volunteers attending the Baileys Rocks Campout (credit Tim Burnard). Below: Volunteers were treated to a delicious cake thanks to Kerry Gilkes (credit Kerry Gilkes).


BirdLife Australia and the Red-tail Recovery Team would like to sincerely thank all the wonderful volunteer observers involved on the day, including those that reported sightings in the lead up to the count. Without your incredible effort, this event would not be possible.

Also, thank you to those volunteers who offered to trial our first ever annual count smartphone app. The app sequence developed to improve data handling and accuracy, received mixed reviews, but was found to be very useful for detailing the exact route taken on the day. The Recovery Team will be looking to take on board people’s feedback and suggested improvements in readiness for next year’s count.

Finally, a special thanks to Evan Roberts and Kerry Gilkes for their assistance with promoting the count and getting local landholders involved on the day and Tim Burnard for running the training session in Casterton and organising the campsite at Baileys Rocks.

The SERTBC Recovery Program is managed by BirdLife Australia and is supported by Natural Resources South East, Glenelg Hopkins Catchment Management Authority and Wimmera Catchment Management Authority through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

 

Sightings and counts of South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos recorded as part of 2016 annual count - note double counts excluded.

 

Annual Count 2015

More than 135 volunteers participating in the range-wide search for the endangered SERTBC have helped to locate over 1500 birds in stringybark country across the South-east of South Australia and South-West Victoria.

The count, which was held on Saturday 2 May, has proved to be a big success with 38 sightings of birds and eight large flocks ranging in size between 75-349 individuals located. In total 1545 birds were counted which is seventy seven more birds than our previous best tally of 1468 recorded back in 2012.

The result is particularly pleasing given the lower number of birds recorded in the two years previous. This confirms our suspicions about birds being missed in previous counts, rather than the population suffering a rapid decline.
 
Although the number of birds recorded is the best yet it should not be interpreted as a population increase. The critically small population is believed to be still in decline based on the ongoing loss and deterioration of the species’ key habitats.

This year the birds were again dispersed widely, with sightings from as far north as Mt Charles in South Australia to Rennick State Forest in the far south-west of Victoria.

By far the greatest concentrations (over 67%) of Red-tails were found in the southern part of the range, with large flocks found near Rennick, Comaum, Nangwarry, Digby and Roseneath State Forest. As in 2012, many of the larger flocks were recorded coming in to drink at farm troughs, making for accurate counting.

The largest flock encountered this year, totalling a staggering 349 birds, was found coming in to drink on private property to the east of Rennick State Forest in the days following the count.

The most birds counted on the day (Saturday 2 May) went to the Lord Family, who counted a whopping 272 birds over the course of the day.

Over 70% of the birds found on the day were recorded in or adjacent to tracts of Brown Stringybark forest. An abundance of Red-tails in a particular area generally coincides with the fruiting patterns of the stringybark. Based on this knowledge, it would appear that the Brown Stringybark is carrying the most recent seed crop.

Several mid to large sized flocks were also encountered in the northern parts of the range. Of particular interest were the 100 birds feeding in Mt-Arapiles – Tooan State Park around 20kms south-west of Natimuk. Although the park is within the cockatoo’s range the birds are not commonly recorded in this area.

Other areas in which Red-tails were recorded include Meereek State Forest, Yallakar State Forest, Clear Lake, Frances, Powers Creek, Penola West, Naracoorte Ranges and Lucindale.

Again, there was an absence of birds recorded around Casterton (where two years ago 233 birds were recorded) and around Lower Glenelg National Park. Both areas have, in more recent years, been largely affected by fire.

The success of this years’ count has been attributed to the large number of pre-count sightings and information received in the weeks leading up to the count. In particular, information with regard to drinking sites has enabled team members and volunteers to be strategically placed at watering points where birds have been recently seen drinking.

In addition, the weather conditions on the day where in general far more conducive to searching for Red-tails than last year.
 
Information gained from the annual count is used to determine patterns of habitat use, the minimum number of birds and most importantly the number and location of large flocks. This information is critical for project staff to be able to carry out annual flock counts (counts of males vs barred birds - females and juveniles), which provide the best and only indication of breeding success.
 
The annual count also helps to raise awareness of the needs of the cockatoo and offers volunteers a chance to become involved in recovery activities.

Volunteer effort was again outstanding with 69 groups spending over 275 hours scouring more than 2,800 kms of stringybark forest for the cockatoos across the range.

The annual Bailey’s Rock Dinner and Campout was again a success with around 25 volunteers attending the night. As usual there was a good amount of bragging and banter about who saw the most birds, plus some informative talks from Tim and Richard about Red-tails.

On behalf of BirdLife Australia and the Red-tail Recovery Team I would like to congratulate and express my sincere thanks to all the wonderful volunteer observers, including those that reported sightings in the lead up to the count.

I’d also like to say a special thanks to Evan Roberts, Felicity Lord, Ros Bradey and Kerry Gilkes for their assistance with promoting the count and getting local landholders involved on the day and Tim Burnard for running the training session in Casterton and organising the campsite at Baileys Rocks.

Observations and counts of South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos recorded as part of 2014 annual count.
 
 
Annual Count 2014
 
Around 130 volunteers took part in the 2014 annual count for the endangered South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo across South-eastern South Australia and South-western Victoria. Covering more than 3200km’s of forest, this year our volunteers counted 1064 Red-tails in stringybark forest from Keith to Mount Gambier in SA and Benayeo to Dergholm in Victoria.
 
The heavy rain and high winds on both the Friday and Saturday made locating birds difficult. Many of the tracks were impassable due to boggy conditions, while the gusty winds proved to be problematic for our counters when trying to listen out for Red-tails.
 
While the weather conditions and inaccessibility of tracks resulted in a poor count of birds by sunset on the 3 May, extensive follow up work in the week after the count resulted in an additional 462 birds included in the final tally. The tally of 1064 birds is slightly down on last year’s tally of 1118 birds and 404 birds down on our record count in 2012.
 
Red-tails are highly nomadic, ranging from Natimuk to Nelson in south-western Victoria and from Mount Gambier to Keith in the South East of South Australia, so finding them over an 18,000km2 area can be quite challenging.
 
It’s more likely that birds were simply missed on the day, rather than the population suffering a significant rapid decline over the last two years.
 
This year the birds were dispersed widely across the range, with counters finding Red-tails near Dergholm, Nangwarry, Comaum, Clear Lake, Edenhope, Lucindale, Frances, Wandilo, Keith and Naracoorte. The biggest flocks encountered this year were 372 birds near Boilaar Swamp in Roseneath State Forest and 122 birds in Nangwarry Native Forest Reserve.
 
This year’s winners of the most birds counted on the day (Saturday 3 May) go to Jim Childs and Kathleen and Bevan Staude, who located 110 cockatoos near Nangwarry. Follow up counts resulted in additional 12 birds being added to the tally, bringing the flock total for Nangwarry to 122 birds.
 
This year there was an absence of birds in some of the cockatoo’s more usual haunts, such as around Casterton where last year a huge flock of 233 birds were recorded. It appears that these birds have moved north to feed in the stringybark around Dergholm. This may be due to the fruiting patterns of the stringybark and the large area of stringybark habitat around Casterton affected by fire.
 
Unfortunately, there were no birds recorded in Rennick State Forest despite a flock of up to 60 birds having been recorded feeding and roosting there in the months leading up to the count. The recent planned burns may be to blame, with both the birds’ feeding habitat and roosting site having been burnt.
 
Information gained from the annual count is used to determine the location of large flocks, patterns of habitat use and the minimum number of birds known to be alive. It also raises awareness of the needs of the cockatoo and offers volunteers a chance to become involved in recovery activities.
 
This year we again had a wonderful turnout of volunteers ranging from locals, including farmers who chose to search their own land, and metropolitan participants who travelled from as far as Adelaide and Melbourne to help out on the day.

Around 15 of our volunteers braved the wintery conditions and converged on Baileys Rocks for the annual BBQ and campout. As usual volunteers compared stories and tales of their days’ adventures, with cockatoos proving to be difficult to find this year by our campers.  

On behalf of BirdLife Australia and the Red-tail Recovery Team I would like to express many thanks to all our wonderful volunteers. Without your incredible effort, this event would not be possible.

Observations and counts of South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos recorded as part of 2014 annual count.

 

Annual Count 2013

More than 130 volunteers participated on Saturday 4 May as part of the 2013 Annual Count for the endangered South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo. Fortunately enough, weather conditions on the day were favourable for counting birds, with many volunteers spending hours upon hours scouring the stringybark tracks in hope of spotting a few cockatoos.

Covering more than 2500 kms of stringybark forest and spending around 236 hours searching, this year our wonderful team of volunteers counted 1118 birds (excluding double counts) in stringybark forest across the species range in South East of SA and South West Victoria.

Despite a good number of reports in the lead up to the count, the final tally was down by 350 birds on last year’s record-breaking tally of 1468 birds. Although we had hoped to better last year’s result, 1118 birds is still a reasonable tally of cockatoos nevertheless. It’s likely that birds were just missed on the day, rather than the population suffering a significant decline over the last year.

Red-tails are highly nomadic, roaming from Natimuk to Nelson in south-western Victoria and from Mount Gambier to Keith in the South East of South Australia. Finding them can be quite a challenge, especially if they are not calling or are feeding in stringybark forest on private land that is inaccessible to counters.

This year, large flocks were recorded near Edenhope, Casterton, Benayeo, Natimuk and Naracoorte. There were a large number of birds in the Edenhope area, with a flock of 277 found in Yallakar State Forest by locals Gloria Freeman and Geraldine Ryan. Both women have had a long interest in the birds and participating in the Annual Count, with Gloria having taken part in every count since they began more than 18 years ago.

“We care so much about Red-tails, and enjoy participating in the count and educating kids about the importance of conserving these birds for future generations to come,” said Gloria.

Most of the birds were found feeding in Desert Stringybark forest, which typically occurs in and around Casterton, Edenhope and Naracoorte. Interestingly, few birds were recorded south of Strathdownie, with none found in the Lower Glenelg National Park. Low numbers of birds have been recorded in this area since 2010. This is thought to be due to the fruiting patterns of the Brown Stringybark, and more recently, as the result of large wildfires which have scorched more than 7000 ha of stringybark habitat in the Kentbruck area alone.  

This year we had 20 people attend the annual Bailey’s Rock BBQ and Campout. As usual there was much good-hearted banter about who counted the most cockies, with Geraldine and Gloria claiming victory this year with their huge flock of 277 birds. They were closely followed by Richard Hill, Dick Cooper, Kay & Noel Stratman and myself (lucky enough), who teamed up to count 233 birds coming to drink near Casterton.

Volunteers who attended the Annual Bailey's Rocks BBQ & Campout (Photo: Tim Burnard)
 
So what next? The annual count not only provides us with the minimum number of birds, but also helps us determine patterns of habitat use and, more importantly, the location of large flocks. Over the next few weeks, this information will help us undertake our annual flock counts, which provide us with an indication of last year’s breeding success, and an overall snapshot of how the population is faring. Results of these counts will be published in the next edition of Red-tail News. You can be placed on the mailing list by contacting Bronwyn Perryman at redtail@birdlife.org.au.

Importantly, the annual count provides a great opportunity for the community to become involved in the recovery program and learn about the conservation of this endangered bird. We again had a good turnout of volunteers, ranging from locals, including farmers who chose to search their own properties on the day, to those who have travelled from afar, including Adelaide and Melbourne. Furthermore, many volunteers who participated on the day have continued to return year after year to help search for cockatoos, with some having participated in all 18 counts.

On behalf of BirdLife Australia and the Red-tail Recovery Team I would like to express many thanks to all our wonderful volunteers who have helped out yet again to make this event so successful, including those who were called upon at the last minute. Without your incredible effort, this event would not be possible – so a big thanks to all.

I’d also like to say special thanks to Dick Cooper & Tim Burnard for locating and keeping tabs on the Casterton birds in the lead up to the count; Evan Roberts for all his work in organising local landholders to search their own properties on the day; and Kerry Gilkes for her time spent trying to locate birds north of Kingston.
 

Observations and counts of South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoos recorded as part of 2013 annual count.

 

Annual Count 2012

The results of the 2012 count have been released showing it was the ‘best year’ since the count started.

A dedicated team of 160 volunteers (61 groups) set out on 5 May 2012 to search for the elusive South-eastern Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo in stringybark habitat across the species range, from Nelson to Natimuk in Victoria and Keith to Mt Gambier in South Australia. Covering more than 2600kms of stringybark forest across more than 60 sites, volunteers created history and found themselves a part of one of the most successful counts since they first started more than 16 years ago.

A total of 1468 birds were counted by volunteers on the day, which is the highest number of birds recorded since counting commenced in 1996. The previous best tally was 1404 birds in 2008.
Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo Recovery Project Coordinator, Bronwyn Perryman, said the results of this year’s count were ‘very encouraging’, especially given the low numbers of birds (<850 birds) counted in the three years previous.

“The population appears to have remained relatively stable over the last 4 years, despite the low numbers of birds recorded since 2009. This year’s result confirms our suspicions about birds being missed in previous years, rather than the population suffering a population decline” said Mrs Perryman.

The success of 2012 count was believed to be the result of good weather conditions on the day, the accessibility of the birds, experienced counters, and phone-in sightings from landholders and members of the public that weren’t involved in the count, but observed birds on the day.

Pairs of birds and flocks ranging in size from 7 to 200 were observed on both private and public land, with the main hotspots in and around Edenhope, Dergholm, Powers Creek, Nangwarry, Harrow, Rennick and Wandilo. Similarly, as in 2008, many of the larger flocks were recorded coming into drink at farm troughs and dams, making for accurate counting.

More importantly, over 60% of the birds counted were recorded within a 30km radius of Edenhope. This is likely to be attributed to the heavy seed crop and recent fruiting of the Desert Stringybark in the area, and the good seed crop observed in the Buloke this year.

Red-tails feed almost exclusively on Desert and Brown Stringybark, and seasonally on Buloke. Buloke fruiting can be highly variable from year to year, but in the event of a good seeding year (as observed this year) hundreds of Red-tails will flock to the northern parts of the range to exploit this food resource. This highlights the importance of protecting and restoring both stringybark and buloke feeding habitat.

Over the next few weeks, information gained through the annual count will assist BirdLife Australia staff to undertake all-important flock counts, which provide an indication of last year’s breeding success, and give an overall snapshot of how the population is faring. Preliminary results of these counts, so far, indicate good numbers of juveniles, which corresponds with the many young birds observed by volunteers on count day.

Apart from helping with research efforts, the count promotes awareness of the conservation needs of this local flagship species and provide a great activity, enjoyed by young and old. This year there was a fantastic turnout at the annual Bailey’s Rock Dinner and Campout with 25-30 volunteers attending the night. “There was a real buzz of excitement as each person arrived with more and more birds to add to the tally” said Mrs Perryman. “We would like to thank all involved and acknowledge that without our volunteers help and support this event would not be possible.”
 

Annual Count 2011

A big thank you to all 160 volunteers taking part in the Annual Count held on Saturday May 7th. Conditions on the day were good but rains earlier in the year made many of the tracks impassable.
Final numbers are now in and it looks as if another low count will be recorded for the third year in a row. While the result of 837 is slightly more than previous years, it doesn’t come close to the 2008 result of 1404 birds.
Red-tails roam from the Lower Glenelg National Park up to Keith and from Lucindale to Balmoral, so finding them in an 18,000 km2 area is always a challenge. It’s likely that many birds were missed in the scrub, rather than suffering a population decline since the record 2008 count.
Overall, Red-tails appear to have moved north in recent months. The biggest mob (201 birds) was spotted north east of Edenhope by long time Red-tail observers Ros and Andrew Bradey. Interestingly, very few birds were sighted south of Casterton.
The Annual Count gives an indication of population size. By taking this snapshot across the range, we get a better understanding of the Red-tails preferred habitat, which is used to target future conservation works. The count is also important in locating larger flocks. We conduct special counts of the larger flocks to give us an indication of the last years breeding success.
Importantly, the annual count is a great way for the community to get involved in Red–tail recovery with 163 volunteers taking part this year; some travelling from as far as Adelaide and Melbourne. Most volunteers however were relatively local including many farmers surveying their own properties.

Click  image for enlargement (pdf Format)

As usual, there was a campout at Baileys Rocks (just north of Dergholm) with about 20 people attending and sharing tales of success (or not) in locating birds. Max Arney, another long time supporter of the Red-tails topped the score at the campout with 75. I need to find out his secret as he often finds big mobs on count day and I rarely see any!
Apart from helping our research efforts, the count is a great way to promote awareness of the conservation needs of this local flagship species and provide a fantastic activity, enjoyed by young and old.
This event would not be possible without the help and support of our fantastic network of volunteers. A big thank you to all those involved – we couldn’t do it without you! If you haven’t been involved in the Annual Count before, but would like to join in next year, please contact us on freecall 1800 262 062 or via email rtbc@birdsaustralia.com.au.

2001 Campout, Baileys Rocks

Past Annual Count results are available to download as a larger version here
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